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In a potential threat to Trump administration efforts to roll back the Clean Power Plan (CPP), state and environmentalist supporters of the rule are urging an appellate court to issue a long-delayed ruling in litigation over the rule's merits, charging that EPA efforts to repeal it without firm plans for a replacement would leave its obligation to regulate power sector greenhouse gases “unfulfilled.”

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's new directive ordering the agency to end so-called “sue-and-settle” suits is being met with concern by industry attorneys and skepticism by environmentalists, who say the order could make settlements impossible, even in cases where the agency has a mandatory duty to act, and will likely result in more litigation and court orders providing the agency with less time to act.

EPA Region 8 Administrator Doug Benevento says he hopes to assist Administrator Scott Pruitt in achieving his “laudable” policy goals including overhauling the Superfund program to accelerate cleanups, citing his prior experience on cleanup issues as a Colorado state official as offering useful relevant experience.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's decision to repeal the Clean Power Plan (CPP) without formally proposing a replacement appears aimed at minimizing political blowback from conservatives hostile to any greenhouse gas controls but could pose a legal risk for the agency if the courts interpret it as dilatory given mandates to regulate GHGs, industry sources and former officials say.

The top Democrat on the Senate Environment & Public Works Committee (EPW) is attacking four Trump administration nominees to EPA for what he says are inadequate responses to questions on ethical and regulatory issues, underscoring the minority's opposition to the nominees ahead of an Oct. 18 business meeting where senators will vote on them.

The top Democrat on the Senate Environment & Public Works Committee (EPW) is attacking four EPA nominees for what he says are inadequate responses to questions on ethical and regulatory issues, underscoring the minority's opposition to the nominees ahead of an Oct. 18 business meeting where senators will vote on them.

The announcement of the impending closure of three Texas coal-fired power plants is raising questions over the future of litigation environmentalists are pursuing against the state's EPA-backed plan for curbing regional haze-forming emissions, because the plan relies in part on the facilities' participation in an emissions trading program.